Mike Williams Driving School - Mike Williams Driving School

Passed. Charlie Lloyd of Gloucester

Passed. Charlie Lloyd of Gloucester

1st Time Pass...


Passed. Andras Kocsis of Gloucester

Passed. Andras Kocsis of Gloucester

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Passed. Joe Hartshorn of Gloucester

Passed. Joe Hartshorn of Gloucester

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Passed. Balazs Kocsis of Gloucester

Passed. Balazs Kocsis of Gloucester

1st Time Pass...


Passed. Zack Evans of Gloucester

Passed. Zack Evans of Gloucester

1st Time Pass...


Passed. Alice Howard of Gloucester

Passed. Alice Howard of Gloucester

1st Time Pass...


Passed. Chloe Perez of Gloucester

Passed. Chloe Perez of Gloucester

...


Passed. Annamaria Kiss of Gloucester

Passed. Annamaria Kiss of Gloucester

1st Time Pass...


Passed. Rumona Nyajery of Gloucester

Passed. Rumona Nyajery of Gloucester

...


Passed. Dylan Davies of Gloucester

Passed. Dylan Davies of Gloucester

1st Time Pass...


Passed. Hannah Allen-Western of Gloucester

Passed. Hannah Allen-Western of Gloucester

...


Passed. Lucy Cain of Gloucester

Passed. Lucy Cain of Gloucester

1st Time Pass...


Passed. James Norman of Gloucester

Passed. James Norman of Gloucester

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Passed. Jordan Stevens of Gloucester.

Passed. Jordan Stevens of Gloucester.

1st Time Pass...


Passed. Jack Dawson of Gloucester

Passed. Jack Dawson of Gloucester

...


Passed. Francesca Lance of Gloucester

Passed. Francesca Lance of Gloucester

1st Time Pass...


Passed. Julia Yip of Gloucester

Passed. Julia Yip of Gloucester

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Passed. Alex Bowkett of Gloucester

Passed. Alex Bowkett of Gloucester

1st Time Pass...


Passed. Matt Wills of Gloucester

Passed. Matt Wills of Gloucester

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Passed. Michael Smith of Gloucester

Passed. Michael Smith of Gloucester

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Passed. Chelsea Sysum of Gloucester

Passed. Chelsea Sysum of Gloucester

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Passed. Terence Babarinsa of Gloucester.

Passed. Terence Babarinsa of Gloucester.

1st Time Pass....


Passed. Tom Horton of Gloucester

Passed. Tom Horton of Gloucester

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Passed. Martin Brookes of Gloucester

Passed. Martin Brookes of Gloucester

1st Time Pass...


Passed. Natalie Yip of Gloucester

Passed. Natalie Yip of Gloucester

1st Time Pass...


Passed. Jacob Prosser of Gloucester

Passed. Jacob Prosser of Gloucester

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Passed. Jackie Korba of Gloucester

Passed. Jackie Korba of Gloucester

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Passed. Megan Holliday of Gloucester.

Passed. Megan Holliday of Gloucester.

1st Time Pass...


Passed. Tom Gennaio of Gloucester

Passed. Tom Gennaio of Gloucester

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Passed. Dave Livesey of Gloucester

Passed. Dave Livesey of Gloucester

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Passed. Tom Bailey of Gloucester.

Passed. Tom Bailey of Gloucester.

...


Passed. Sian Burrin of Gloucester.

Passed. Sian Burrin of Gloucester.

1st Time Pass....


Passed. Cameron Billingham of Gloucester

Passed. Cameron Billingham of Gloucester

1st Time Pass...


Passed. Kimberley Legge of Gloucester

Passed. Kimberley Legge of Gloucester

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Passed. Jamie Shore of Gloucester

Passed. Jamie Shore of Gloucester

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Passed. Rob Watson of Gloucester

Passed. Rob Watson of Gloucester

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Passed. Chloe Walker of Gloucester

Passed. Chloe Walker of Gloucester

1st Time Pass...


Passed. Dan Goodwin of Gloucester

Passed. Dan Goodwin of Gloucester

1st Time Pass...


Passed. Glen Miles of Gloucester

Passed. Glen Miles of Gloucester

...


Passed. Michael Waldron of Gloucester

Passed. Michael Waldron of Gloucester

1st Time Pass...


Passed. Joe Yeates of Gloucester

Passed. Joe Yeates of Gloucester

1st Time Pass...


Passed. Sam Watson of Gloucester

Passed. Sam Watson of Gloucester

1st Time Pass...


Passed. John Holmyard of Gloucester

Passed. John Holmyard of Gloucester

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Passed. Clive Manning of Gloucester

Passed. Clive Manning of Gloucester

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Passed. Lucy Pearce of Gloucester

Passed. Lucy Pearce of Gloucester

1st Time Pass...


Passed. Jess Woolley of Gloucester

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Passed. Michael Faulkner of Gloucester

Passed. Michael Faulkner of Gloucester

1st Time Pass...


Passed. Molly Finnegan of Gloucester.

Passed. Molly Finnegan of Gloucester.

1st Time Pass...


Passed. Nathan Fry of Gloucester.

Passed. Nathan Fry of Gloucester.

1st Time Pass....


Passed. Sophie Peoples of Gloucester.

Passed. Sophie Peoples of Gloucester.

.....With ZERO driving faults!!...


Passed. Sam Bevis of Gloucester.

Passed. Sam Bevis of Gloucester.

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Passed. Clare Cave-Ayland of Gloucester.

Passed. Clare Cave-Ayland of Gloucester.

1st Time Pass....


Passed. Jake Collier of Gloucester.

Passed. Jake Collier of Gloucester.

1st Time Pass....


Passed. James Rafferty of Gloucester.

Passed. James Rafferty of Gloucester.

1st Time Pass...


Passed. Fayaz Ahmed of Gloucester.

Passed. Fayaz Ahmed of Gloucester.

...


Passed. Dean Jouni of Cheltenham

Passed. Dean Jouni of Cheltenham

1st Time Pass....WITH ZERO Driving Faults....


Passed. Gift Mtshali of Gloucester.

Passed. Gift Mtshali of Gloucester.

...


Passed. Poppy Richards of Gloucester.

Passed. Poppy Richards of Gloucester.

1st Time Pass...


Passed. Tom Hodkinson of Gloucester.

Passed. Tom Hodkinson of Gloucester.

1st Time Pass...


Passed. Tammy Mahoney of Gloucester

Passed. Tammy Mahoney of Gloucester

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Passed. Hannah Sayers of Gloucester

Passed. Hannah Sayers of Gloucester

1st Time Pass...


Passed. Karen Blagg of Gloucester

Passed. Karen Blagg of Gloucester

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Passed. Dylan Parry of Gloucester

Passed. Dylan Parry of Gloucester

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Passed. Hannah Baker of Gloucester.

Passed. Hannah Baker of Gloucester.

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Passed. Sharon Stott of Stonehouse.

Passed. Sharon Stott of Stonehouse.

1st Time Pass...


Passed. Tom Legge of Gloucester

Passed. Tom Legge of Gloucester

1st Time Pass...


Passed. Hazi Hossain of Gloucester

Passed. Hazi Hossain of Gloucester

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Passed. Lusupi Melele of Gloucester

Passed. Lusupi Melele of Gloucester

1st Time Pass...


Passed. Sikandar Khan of Gloucester

Passed. Sikandar Khan of Gloucester

1st Time Pass...


Passed. Daniel Palmer of Yate

Passed. Daniel Palmer of Yate

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Passed. Tyler D'Andrea of Gloucester

Passed. Tyler D'Andrea of Gloucester

1st Time Pass...


Passed. Billy Kehoe of Cheltenham

Passed. Billy Kehoe of Cheltenham

1st Time Pass...


Passed. Jazz Cooper of Gloucester

Passed. Jazz Cooper of Gloucester

1st time Pass...


Passed. Vickie Clarke of Gloucester.

Passed. Vickie Clarke of Gloucester.

...


Passed. Rose Powell of Gloucester.

Passed. Rose Powell of Gloucester.

1st Time Pass....


Passed. Dominic Smith of Gloucester

Passed.  Dominic Smith of Gloucester

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Passed. Michael Blair of Gloucester

Passed. Michael Blair of Gloucester

1st time Pass...


Passed. Stacey Adams of Gloucester

Passed. Stacey Adams of Gloucester

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Passed. Libby Cookson of Gloucester

Passed. Libby Cookson of Gloucester

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Passed. Kita Morgan of Gloucester

Passed. Kita Morgan of Gloucester

1st Time Pass...


Passed. Francesca Belletty of Gloucester

Passed. Francesca Belletty of Gloucester

1st Time Pass...


Passed. Dave Rich of Gloucester

Passed. Dave Rich of Gloucester

1st Time Pass...


Passed. Rob Garland of Gloucester

Passed. Rob Garland of Gloucester

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Passed. Magda Kochanek of Gloucester

Passed. Magda Kochanek of Gloucester

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Passed. Emily Palmer of Gloucester

Passed. Emily Palmer of Gloucester

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Did you know?

Driving Lessons Driving Schools Driving Instructors in Gloucester.


Driving Lessons Driving Schools Driving Instructors in Cheltenham

 

Did You Know?..... Improve your driving knowlege

Telephone 01452 290121
 
 
 
Welcome to the Did you know? section of the website.

Each week we will add some useful facts that you may not know or you may have forgotten.

The new highway code was launched in September 07 and if you are a parent surfing for your children's driving lessons, you may not have seen this book for a very long time.

Please scroll down the page to keep up to date.


 
 
 
Live in Gloucester and Cheltenham and thinking of learning to drive or you are already taking driving lessons and becoming frustrated? Why not join a driving school that is “refreshingly different” where you will benefit from the latest and proven teaching methods.

You don’t have to take our word for it, read the comments of previous customers after taking their driving lessons with me. Driving Lessons Gloucester and Driving Lessons Cheltenham should be an enjoyable and straight forward process when following a structured course of lessons. It is vital that each of your driving lessons has a definite objective and you clearly understand exactly what you are trying to achieve during the lesson.

Far too many driving lessons in Gloucester and Cheltenham consist of aimless driving around Gloucester and Cheltenham with no definite purpose or objective. When you make a mistake with your driving it is imperative that you understand exactly what the mistake is, how you can fix it and why it occurred. This is not rocket science, but many driving instructors fail to follow these simple but very effective guidelines.

Important Note: If you do not have a definite objective for each of your driving lessons, then your learning period will almost certainly take you longer and cost you more of your hard earned money. I pride myself on being “Refreshingly Different” to my competitors and I receive many testimonials praising my teaching methods.

To think all driving instructors in Gloucester or Cheltenham are the same would be a huge mistake as many teach with no clear objectives and therefore extending your learning period, costing you more money than is necessary. If you are currently learning to drive in Gloucester and do not have a very clear objective at the beginning of each lesson then how can you possibly understand what is expected of you during the driving lesson.

You are more than welcome to join me here at Mike Williams Driving School, where you can join over 200 other local students that have passed their driving tests with me. I wish you happy driving,

Best Wishes

Mike Williams

 
 
 

01452 290121

 
 
 
Your Driving Lessons Gloucester and Driving Lessons Cheltenham should be structured in such a way that you will gain maximum value for your money. Far too many students are becoming frustrated with their lack of progress and in many cases it’s more to do with how their lessons are structured rather than lack of ability.

One of the key aspects to learning to drive is having a clear and concise objective for every driving lesson you take. If you are currently taking driving lessons and you do not begin each session with an interactive discussion on the chosen subject, you may be trying to learn with your hands tied behind your back. I will explain:

The reason for the interactive questions and answer session before you begin is to check your theory understanding of the subject to be covered. Here your driving instructor can help with any misunderstanding that you may have and make sure you have a sound knowledge of the subject to be covered. It is vital to understand why you are required to do something and the possible consequences of not doing it correctly. One of the reasons that you may have become frustrated with your driving lessons in Gloucester or Cheltenham is because you do not understand what is required from you. This really is like driving with your hands behind your back.

The next step is to have a very clear objective for the current driving lesson. You cannot simply drive off on your lesson without knowing exactly what you are trying to achieve. If your driving lesson is an introduction to a new subject, let’s say Roundabouts, once the sequence in the previous paragraph has been completed then you can practice the practical part of roundabouts. Your driving instructor should be helping you with full talk through to make sure you succeed.

When you start to become comfortable performing roundabouts with your driving instructor's help, then it would be a good time to stop and have an interactive discussion to check your understanding and to deal with any issues that may have occurred. Now let’s move forward to your next driving lesson: Today's objective is roundabouts... so why are we doing roundabouts again? Let’s say that on the last lesson you became reasonably confident with most aspects of roundabouts, but lane discipline and the decision to emerge was still uncomfortable for you.

So the OBJECTIVE of the current driving lesson should be: Today we are going to cover roundabouts once again with the specific objective of helping you to become more confident with your lane discipline and also making decisions when to emerge. You see this is NOT aimless driving around but working on a clear and concise topic that need addressing for you to move on with your driving. At the end of the lesson the procedure is repeated. Are you now confident in all aspects of roundabouts? If not, what parts are you still not sure about? The objective is then set to deal with those issues.

This applies to all subject covered in the learning to drive syllabus. So the next time you get in your instructor's car and shoot off without a discussion about what will be covered or you do not understand exactly what you are trying to achieve and why, I suggest that you are most definitely not getting full value for your money and you will certainly be prolonging your learning period not to mention the cost.

Here at Mike Williams Driving School I spend a lot of time and investment in training to deliver quality lessons to this format.... and does it ever produce results . We boast a pass rate of 70% in 2014. when the local average in Gloucester is just 40%.

 
 
 

Seven steps to your driving test success.

  1. Make sure that your instructor always does a recap on the previous lesson to check what you knowledge you have retained.
  2. Make sure your driving instructor gives you an objective for each lesson (It is vital that you know what you are trying to achieve during the current lesson)
  3. Are you being allowed to develop your skills? Once you have mastered the task, it is vital that you are then coached with prompted questions to take responsibility and confirm that learning has taken place.
  4. Never be frightened to make mistakes. Your driving instructor should be encouraging independent driving and giving you help, support and encouragement with positive feedback.
  5. By the time you are approaching a test date, you should be driving for long spells on an independent basis, if you are still making lots of mistakes then feedback is vital to you and you will need to focus and practice on weaknesses. Try not to miss any of your pre-booked lessons at this stage as the last few weeks are vital.
  6. Always insist on taking a mock test .This is to see how you will perform under pressure while on your driving test. Any weaknesses remaining can be fixed before the big day.
  7. If you have been driving on a regular basis with your instructor without his help and avoiding too many mistakes, then there is no reason why you cannot do this during the driving test-driving test examiners are trained to recognise nerves when they assess you’re driving and the odd few mistakes will generally not result in a driving test fail.
 
 
 

Value for your money.

If you are to get the most from your driving lessons, you will need to follow these guidelines, aimless driving around with no firm learning objectives will be a waste of your money and it will also extend your learning period.

With an average of 1 driving test pass every week and well over 200 test passes in the local area we know what we are talking about .

 
 
 
Why is the first time pass rate so low?

The average 1st time pass rate at our local driving test centres is around 40%, which is ridiculously low.

At Mike Williams Driving School I have an average 1st time pass rate of around 70%. This is because I work to a tried and tested system. I do not take pupils to test unless I feel they are going to pass (otherwise I waste your time and your money).

I do not have a set amount of hours to complete as each individual will be different; however I do have a strict set of criteria to be covered. The Driving Standards Agency set out a syllabus to be covered and you need to be proficient in all the tasks listed if you are to pass your driving test.

You need to be able to drive independently without the assistance of your driving instructor on a regular basis. If you are still making mistakes during your lessons then these mistakes are likely to escalate when under the pressure of a driving test.

If however you are able to drive during your lessons with only a few errors then this should give you the confidence on test day, many blame nerves for failing, but in reality it’s usually more to do with the lack of consistency.

Feedback from your driving instructor is vital as to your strengths and weaknesses if you are to achieve the required standard.

 
 
 
How to pass your driving test first time!
 
Why is the first time pass rate so low?
The average 1st time pass rate at our local driving test centres is around 30%, which is ridiculously low.


At Mike Williams Driving School I have an average 1st time pass rate of around 70%. This is because I work to a tried and tested system. I do not take pupils to test unless I feel they are going to pass (otherwise I waste your time and your money).


I do not have a set amount of hours to complete as each individual will be different; however I do have a strict set of criteria to be covered. The Driving Standards Agency set out a syllabus to be covered and you need to be proficient in all the tasks listed if you are to pass your driving test.


You need to be able to drive independently without the assistance of your driving instructor on a regular basis. If you are still making mistakes during your lessons then these mistakes are likely to escalate when under the pressure of a driving test.


If however you are able to drive during your lessons with only a few errors then this should give you the confidence on test day, many blame nerves for failing, but in reality it’s usually more to do with the lack of consistency.


Feedback from your driving instructor is vital as to your strengths and weaknesses if you are to achieve the required standard.
 
 
 
Accident Blackspots and causes of RTA's.
 

Accident blackspots are locations where there are more road traffic accidents in which people are injured than on average. Sometimes these are the result of dangerous road layouts and features such as steep hills, tight bends and dangerous road junctions; and sometimes they are locations where drivers tend to have an over-optimistic view of the safety of the road and take more risks than they normally would.


A typical example of the latter is three lane roads where both directions of traffic flow have access to the central lane. Fortunately nowadays most of these are marked with double white lines that make it illegal for one side to cross to the central lane, though sometimes the roads are converted back to two lanes even though they remain wide enough to encourage overtaking even when there is traffic in the opposite lane.


Every year around 230,000 people are injured on roads in the UK and round about 1% of these injuries prove fatal whist 10% are serious and life changing. The overall trend has been a general reduction in all of these categories despite a significant increase in overall road traffic. The biggest contributory factor of accidents is the failure to look properly. This alone was responsible for around 38% of accidents reported to the police last year and 80% of the contributory factors are due to some kind of driver (or rider) error. The majority of fatalities occur when the driver or rider loses control of the vehicle.


Interestingly speed is a considerably less important factor than most people think. Breaking the speed limit is implicated in only 5% of accidents though it is implicated in 17% of fatalities, though driving too fast for the prevailing conditions is implicated in 13% of accidents and 27% of road deaths. It is likely that reducing the dangers of accident blackspots has contributed to the overall reduction in RTAs though improvements in car safety standards are also an important factor.


A further factor is the reduction in drink driving which is now implicated in only 5% of injuries. A good driving instructor will be able to teach you the skills to make sure you are as safe on the roads as possible, however other road users can still cause accidents. If you have been in a road traffic accident and want to learn more about making a claim, visit www.roadtrafficaccidentsite.com.
 
 
 
Cheap car insurance for young drivers
 

Cheap car insurance for young drivers Are you a new or young driver looking to find cheap car insurance? It might seem like an impossible task, but there are actually a host of ways to reduce premiums and keep money in your pocket. One trick to avoid… Before you read how to earn cheap car insurance, there is one method that you must avoid – fronting. This is when a parent or another experienced driver registers themselves as the main driver of a vehicle with the new or young driver added as a named driver, even though in reality it is the young driver who will do the bulk (or even all) of the driving in that vehicle.


Fronting is actually illegal and if caught, not only could an accident claim be repudiated, but both drivers could be heavily penalised and even be deemed uninsurable. Complete the course… So you’ve just passed your driving test and you’re desperate to get behind the wheel… however, you might want to consider just a little more tuition. Once you have passed your practical driving examination, look to undertake the Pass Plus course which involves driving on a motorway, on a dual carriageway, on country lanes, in a city, at night and in all-weather conditions. The additional tuition doesn’t come cheap, but you may be able to get help with the costs from your local authority. Once completed, the Pass Plus is a sound investment too, because you could receive a discount as high as 35 per cent off your premiums.


Choose the right car… If you haven’t yet bought your first car, then be very careful about the vehicle you choose as it could greatly influence your car insurance premiums. As a general rule of thumb, older cars with smaller engines earn cheaper premiums. That’s because newer cars are usually more expensive to repair/replace; and more powerful cars are more likely to be driven at faster speeds. So choose a sensible car and don’t be tempted to modify it – modifications will add to the vehicle’s value and this will push your insurance costs up further. For a helpful guide as to how much a vehicle costs to insure, use the Association of British Insurers’ database. It categorises vehicles into groups from 1-50 (or previously 1-20) with those in higher groups facing higher premiums.


Think about the cover you need… Car insurance is there to help us if things go wrong and so it’s sensible to get as much cover as possible to protect ourselves against a host of risks. This is why comprehensive cover is usually preferred. However, if you drive an inexpensive car you may prefer to opt for a third party or third party fire and theft policy during your first year of driving. This means you won’t get a payout for damage to your own vehicle if an accident occurs, but at least you’ll have the legal level of cover required in the UK and you won’t be paying over the odds.


Of course if you do opt for comprehensive cover then you should still examine your policy options. For example, you may not want to pay for a courtesy car if you have access to another vehicle anyway; and you may not require commuting or business use cover if you only use your car for general run-arounds. Lower your risk… Insurers base premiums on risk – i.e. the more likely you are to make a claim, the higher your premiums will be. In addition to assessing the vehicle you drive, they will also look at your personal circumstances, such as your age and occupation; your address, for example whether or not you live in an area with a high level of accidents or vehicle crime; your annual mileage; and your driving history.


As a new driver you won’t have a driving history and this works against you in the sense that you won’t have had chance to build up a no-claims bonus. Some insurers do offer young drivers rapid bonus schemes, allowing them to earn a full year’s no-claims bonus in less than 12 months. There are other steps you can take to reduce your risk level, however. For example, you could agree to a mileage cap or to only drive at certain times of the day – such as avoiding the rush hour. You could invest in security features for your car, such as alarms and immobilisers, to reduce the risk of theft, and park in a locked garage overnight. Or you could choose to raise your voluntary excess, which means you’ll make a greater contribution towards a claim. Shop around… Perhaps the most crucial rule that new and young drivers should remember is that every insurer looks at risks differently – and as such there can be huge differences in the premiums you are quoted. Therefore it’s vital to assess as much of the market as possible. This can be done quickly and easily by using a comparison website – the leading websites will compare deals from more than 120 insurers with a single search.
 
 
 
Correct use of mirrors.
 
There has always been a misconception as to why mirror use is so important.
“My dad said; make sure that you move your head so the examiners can you check them”.


“I check my mirrors because my instructor said that I had to”.


“If I don’t check my mirrors I will fail my driving test”.


Let’s look at the real reason you should check your mirrors.


Use of mirrors before signalling:


Before you apply a signal, it is vital that you know what is happening around you.


What if a motorbike is overtaking and you suddenly apply a signal, he could panic if he thinks you haven’t seen him resulting in a sudden change of direction. By noticing the motorbike in the mirrors, you would have the option to delay the signal and let him pass. Even better would be to notice the motorbike gaining on you with early mirror use and you could then apply the signal at an earlier stage to warn of your intentions.


Use of mirrors before changing direction:


Use of mirrors before changing direction is vital to check what is happening beside you. Think of a situation where you are slowing to turn left and a cycle comes off the pavement or when moving out to pass a parked vehicle and a vehicle is overtaking.


Use of mirrors before slowing down:


Imagine approaching a pedestrian crossing where people are stood waiting to cross, the lights could change at any time and a mirror check shows a vehicle very close behind. You could use the information gained to slow in anticipation of a light change, this will also encourage the following vehicle to slow also. Failure to gain this information could result in having to stop suddenly resulting in the following vehicle being unable to stop and possibly crashing in to the back of you.


Use of mirrors before speeding up.


Think of a situation where you have just emerged in to a new road (minor to major) and once straightened up and checked ahead, the next important issue is what is happening behind. Perhaps you may have misjudged the speed of following traffic and they are approaching faster than you thought. You have the option to accelerate up to the limit (if safe) to get a move on or in a scenario where they have already committed to an overtake, you could then choose to slow and enable them to pass safely. Without the information from the mirrors you would be unaware and as a result be involved in a possible crash.
 
 
 
Correct use of signals.
 

Why do we give signals?


The prime purpose is to communicate with other road users and let them know are intentions.


Timing of signals:


When we decide to turn left or right, the timing of our indicator is very important. Should we signal too early it will be confusing as following traffic may think we are going to pull up on the left . Timing is also crucial if there is a side road before the one we intend to turn in to, other road users may think that we intend to turn sooner and as a result may pull out in front of us.


Applying a signal too late will be of little use to anyone. Take the example of turning left again. If we do not inform the traffic behind in plenty of time, they may not have time to react especially if they are not concentrating (they could be distracted or on the phone for example) Now we could adopt the attitude that’s their problem but do we need the agro of a rear end shunt?


Use of a signal when changing direction:


Should we use indicators when changing direction? If we are changing lanes and we have following traffic, it’s a very good idea to tell them our intentions or they may overtake before we have the chance to move out.


Changing direction to pass parked cars can often be confusing. Generally it is preferable to use your road position to send a message to following traffic. We can do this by correct positioning. When approaching a parked vehicle on the left, we can position just left of the centre line (right turn position) This should alert following traffic of our intention to overtake (we can only do two things here overtake or park) It is not wrong to apply an indicator but what if there is a side road on the right! Someone may think we are about to turn right and possibly pull out in front of us. However there will be times when we are not able to position correctly because of other factors (other parked vehicles, narrow road) an indicator will then be required. An indicator should also be used if you think the vehicle behind is looking to move around you.


Using headlights as a signal:


Use of headlights as a signal can be very confusing to other road users.


The official meaning of a headlight flash is to warn other road users of your presence. Now we are all well aware that headlamp flashing is widely used as a signal to proceed. Let’s look at a situation where someone wants to cross your path, for example an oncoming vehicle looking to turn right . You flash your headlamps to let them know that you will wait for them to turn. When you do this other road users will often not check effectively but take “your word for It” that its safe. What if a cyclist is coming up on the left side, they could be unaware of your intentions to wait and the vehicle turning may not see them resulting in a collision.


Another factor with headlamp flashing is when you flash to someone that you know coming towards you, what if there is a vehicle waiting to emerge from a side road, they may misinterpret your meaning and pull out.


Signalling to pedestrians:


We often think we are doing pedestrians a favour by waiting and waving them across the road. Waiting for them to cross itself is not the problem; it’s when we invite them to cross.


They will often “take your word” for it that it’s safe, but what if a cyclist comes up on the inside or a motorcycle is overtaking, they may not have seen the pedestrian or be aware of your attentions resulting in a collision.


Brake lights:


Brake lights are of course very useful to inform following traffic that you are slowing. When you get a situation where you wish to pull up on the left, but an indicator could be confusing when there is a side road to the left, you could squeeze the brakes to inform others that you are slowing and then apply the indicator once passed the junction.


Signalling to move off and stop:


This is often a subject for much debate.


Do you need to apply an indicator when moving off from the side of the road?


Generally if there are no other road users in the area then no one is going to see it. When there is traffic approaching from behind, applying a right indicator can be quite confusing as they may think you are about to pull out in front of them. It is often preferable to wait until they have passed to avoid confusion. In a situation where there are approaching vehicles or pedestrians, an indicator will often be beneficial to let them know your intentions.


Applying an indicator when you intend to pull up at the side of the road is vital when there is following traffic. Failure to do this in good time could result in a rear end collision (very popular in the U.K.).


Use of signals can be quite a complex subject as with most things in driving and is not always black or white. Take advice from your driving instructor / trainer as to how to apply the use of signals in differing situations.
 
 
 
Independent driving in Gloucester.
 

 


The practical driving test had a significant change from the 4th October 2010.



Whereas previously directions during the practical test were generally given junction by junction, this changed and for a period of about ten minutes candidates are now required to drive using road signs and road markings, or to follow a given destination.





If for example , you were following for the M5 you will be expected to look at the directional sign and understand which exit would be required. It will also be vital to look at road markings in plenty of time .


In our local area of Gloucester where road signs and road markings are misleading, incomplete or missing, then a direction card will be shown by the examiner (this will take the form of a card with a series of directions printed on it).


Statistics show that when ‘new drivers’ first drive on their own, following signs and markings can be difficult while trying to control the vehicle and interact with other road users. I feel that at Mike Williams Driving School this should not lead to a drop in practical test passes, but driving independently will need thorough preparation and I will be looking to gradually introduce this element to the syllabus once the basics skills have been mastered. Once the ‘route ‘ to follow has been given by the examiner, candidates will be able to ask for destinations to be repeated without occurring any type of fault and going the ‘wrong way’ will not be considered a driving fault unless a change of direction is done incorrectly.


Candidates with special needs should make this clear when making test bookings, so examiners can adopt a style to suite the individual. It is very important that your driving instructor prepares you in plenty of time so that you may become comfortable with driving independently.
 
 
 
Parents beware.
 

Research from the motor insurance bureau suggests that many parents are unknowingly committing motor insurance fraud by ‘fronting’.


Research shows that over 70% of British drivers do not understand what it means to ‘front’ an insurance policy and of those that do, one in five admit to misleading their insurance company and as a result are committing insurance fraud.


Parents that insure a vehicle in their own names to reduce premiums when their son or daughter uses the car the most, is one of the most common example of ‘fronting’.


This practice is strictly illegal and in the event of a claim could make the insurance invalid and as a result make any savings on the premium false economy and in fact leave you open to prosecution.


Young drivers have the highest proportion of insurance claims, crashes and fatalities’ on the road and this of course is why premiums are so high.


Over a third of drivers justify ‘fronting’ as being a loophole in the law.





New drivers may like to check out www.i-kube.co.uk where it’s possible to gain a 40% reduction on premiums providing you don’t drive between 23.00 and 05.00 (which statistics say is when most new drivers crash)


www.quinn-direct.co.uk is also another company that offer very competitive premiums.


Remember also that some insurance companies offer a substantial discount if you take the Pass Plus course and by attending a local attitude and behaviour workshop you will get a grant of £60.00 towards the cost.
 
 
 
60% fail test.
 

The local 1st time practical pass rate at the Gloucester test centre is only 40%.
Why should this be, if learner drivers are properly prepared then success should be achieved.
The question to ask is “am I making lots of mistakes with my instructor” if so then you are not ready for test. The all right on the night scenario rarely works and when under pressure on test day it can often be worse. Listen to the advice given to you by your instructor and feel comfortable that you are ready to deal with any eventuality that crops up.
At Mike Williams Driving School I am very good at assessing when you will be ready. Because of the waiting times to take a practical test I often have to estimate when you will be ready many weeks in advance, and sometimes for various reasons the student has not progressed as planned.
Having a test booked for 7-8 weeks in advance may seem like a very long time to wait, but if we break this down the first thing is to focus on a mock test 2 weeks before your test. You will have probably just completed a lesson,so the wait is now down to 4 weeks. This is not much time to address any outstanding issues. The mock test does not necessarily have to be passed, but it will give a very real assessment of your prospects. You then have to decide, along with your instructor if test success is likely to be achieved.



The good news is, if you are consistent with your driving and are making just a few mistakes during your driving lessons then there is no reason why you should drive any different on your driving test. Test nerves are often used as the reason for a test fail, but if you are consistently driving well, then this is not generally the reason for being unsuccessful.


During the waiting time for a test to come around, it is essential that you do not miss any of your planned lessons. This can have an adverse effect on the outcome. When we book your test, it will be on the basis of regular lessons and how we feel you will progress during this time.


Company policy is that should the instructor feel that test success is unlikely, then you will be persuaded to reschedule the test until consistency can be achieved.

 
 
 
Changes to ID requirements for driving tests.
 

Changes to ID requirements for driving tests.

DSA has been working closely with the Identity and Passport Service (IPS) so we can accept UK Identity Cards issued by IPS as an alternative means by which candidates may confirm their identity for all types of driving tests and Driver CPC periodic training.

Candidates for driving tests and periodic training need to produce evidence of their entitlement to drive the relevant vehicle and prove their identity before the test or training can commence. Candidates may currently do this by way of a driving licence. Where the licence does not contain a photograph a valid passport is also required.

Candidates will still need to confirm their driving entitlement by producing their driving licence but, from 27 April, candidates who do not have a photocard licence will be able to use a valid UK ID Card issued by IPS as an alternative to their passport.

Any candidate who is unable to satisfy the examiner of their driving entitlement or identity will have their test cancelled and may lose their fee.




 
 
 
Does it matter where you live?
 

Londoners rated as the worst learner drivers


Learners located in London and South East England need more attempts at the driving test to pass compared to every other part of Britain, based on a new survey by the AA.


An overall total of 20,109 people responded to the survey, which revealed that Londoners sat the test on average 2.09 times, while those in the south east needed 2.11 tests, which is five percent worse compared to UK average.


Simon Douglas, the AA Driving School director, said: "Busy, complex roads in London and the South-east appear to contribute to learners there finding it slightly more challenging."


Drivers in the east of England returned the best result, taking just 1.9 attempts to pass. They were closely followed by the North East, Yorkshire & Humberside and the East Midlands.


The Driving Standards Agency (DSA) is quoted as saying that those who have passed their test have had 45 hours of professional training and 22 hours of private practice - on average.


Douglas sums up the findings: "Many factors shape local pass rates. But, wherever you reside, professional tuition using a fully-qualified driving instructor will give you the best possible head start towards passing your L-test and beyond."


The full league table is below:


East of England 1.87


Yorkshire & Humberside 1.91


North-east of England 1.91


East Midlands 1.92


Scotland 1.97


South-west of England 1.97


West Midlands 1.98


Wales 2.02


North-west of England 2.03


Northern Ireland 2.03


London 2.09


South-east of England 2.11
 
 
 
Young Drivers Insurance
 

Young Drivers Insurance Guide.


If you’ve recently passed your test and tried searching looking for insurance, you’ve probably already discovered how expensive insurance for inexperienced drivers can be.


Motor insurance for first time or young drivers can be expensive enough, but with reason. Moneysupermarket.com says: “There are several reasons why younger drivers pay more for their car insurance.


These include:


Drivers are statistically more likely to have an accident in the first two years after passing their test than at any other time. One in five drivers will have a crash in within their first year on the road.


A third of fatalities on UK roads are caused by young drivers aged 17 to 25.


Young drivers also experience more theft, fire and vandalism to their vehicles, which contributes to more claims on their car insurance.


Young drivers are more inclined to be ferrying around a vehicle} full of friends and for that reason face a much greater risk of being involved in an accident than somebody that just uses their car to nip out to the shops mid-afternoon.”


It may seem like the odds are stacked against you somewhat, but by following a few of the tips below, you can save a packet on your young drivers insurance.


Buy a Low Powered Car


Unfortunately, engine size is one is probably one of the biggest factors with regards to the price of your premium whatever your age, a car with a smaller engine will always be cheaper to insure than a big one. Search for cars in as low an insurance group as you possibly can in order to acquire the least expensive policy.


Take a Pass Plus Course


This course is designed to teach recently passed drivers a few advanced driving techniques that could make them better and safer drivers. Many companies offer cheaper car insurance for first time drivers who have completed a pass plus course, up to 35% in some instances. There isn’t a test at the conclusion of the course and it takes only six hours to complete, so for those sorts of savings it’s a bargain!


Try a Multi-Car Policy


If you still live with your parents, it could be worth contacting their insurance providers – some companies offer heavy discounts on multiple cars within the same household, providing a budget car insurance many new drivers would like.


Policies with Restrictions


Some policies offer cheaper premiums at the expense of adding certain restrictions to them – not driving within certain hours of the night, for instance, or paying on a ‘per mile’ basis. Obviously, these might not be of use to everyone, but if you don't use your vehicle during the night time or only travel short distances, policies such as these can help you save significant amounts of money.


Consider Your Excess


The larger your excess, the cheaper your insurance is going to be – this is true of all policies, whether or not you are a new driver or not. However, you need to consider whether you are able to pay this should you have a crash– could you afford to pay a £600 excess after a nasty accident?

Keep it Stock


It’s another sad truth, but induction kits, spoilers, flared arches and the rest all add to your insurance premium – anything that adds value, performance or desirability to the vehicle will probably make that cheap car insurance quote more expensive, although different insurers treat modifications differently.


Add a Named Driver


Adding a mature and more experienced driver to your policy can decrease your premium quite substantially.
 
 
 

Driving Lessons Driving Schools Driving Instructors in Gloucester

Driving Lessons Driving Schools Driving Instructors Cheltenham

 
 




My 1st Lesson Experience...


""I started driving lessons in South Africa about 10 years ago, but only had a few, never having been behind the wheel since until.......

Fast forward to 2013 and now having a growing family, I knew that having the ability to drive is an essential part of our lives.

I was extremely nervous during the days leading up to my first driving lesson, but upon meeting my driving instructor Mike, I knew that I was in safe hands. I was still very anxious and lacking in self-confidence, but he helped me overcome my fear of traffic on the open roads, with constant encouragement, brilliant teaching techniques, patience....and made me feel relaxed."


Tammy Mahoney, Gloucester

Mike is so easy to get along with and I really enjoyed my lessons...


"Mike Williams was my instructor, and a good one he was! I started with Mike when he was with a national driving school, and stuck with him when he left, and staying with Mike was a very good idea. He would tell you instructions, how we would understand. If I did something wrong he would tell me and make me do it untill I did it perfect. That helped me alot, he wouldnt let me give up on anything I was stuck on! It was never awkward when I was taking my lessons, we would always have a chat and a laugh! Mike is so easy to get along with and I really enjoyed my lessons. He would always encourage me which was a great help, kind of miss my lessons now!"

Libby Cookson, Gloucester

His teaching methods were brilliant!


"I had my driving lessons with Mike Williams, as he was recommended to me for which I was glad. I would most definitely highly recommend him as a Driving Instructor.

He is friendly, so easy to talk to and teaches you so well that you learn faster but properly, saving you money. His teaching methods were brilliant! I learnt quickly and could afford to do so as his prices are so great!

It wasn't long before I was taking my Test feeling really confident, and passed 1st time, with only 4 minors.

To sum up...great prices, nice car to drive and an amazing driving instructor. I'm so glad I went with Mike and wouldn't of thought twice about going with someone else."


Rose Powell, Gloucester

Mike explained everything in a way that made sense...


"For many years I had lessons on and of but never continued for one reason or another, but this year decided I just had to do it! I started lessons with Mike who explained things in a way I understood, was easy going and made me feel like I was actually getting somewhere with my lessons. It's easy to come away feeling confused and forgetting things when they aren't explained properly, and Mike explained everything in a way that made sense.

When you enjoy your lessons it is easier to continue and succeed! As a result I've now passed and only had Mike to thank for that!.....he is now teaching my daughter who also feels relaxed with Mike and is quite happy in her lessons. BIG THANKYOU! It really has been a pleasure and I don't have to rely on the buses anymore!!"


Stacey Adams, Gloucester

DSA Independent Driving Test Video:


DSA show me, tell me - under the bonnet : driving test questions:


DSA show me, tell me - outside the car : driving test questions


DSA show me, tell me - inside the car : driving test questions


Official DSA car practical test - Are you ready?


 
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